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It is oft debated what is the best way to tie a bowstring loop.  In this article we tackle several different variations and discuss their advantages and disadvantages.

Everything expressed here is through my own experience and some influence from others.  If you have a different variation or opinion, feel free to comment and I’ll update the article as appropriate.

For instructions on d-loops, visit the “How to make and tie d-loops” article.  For instructions on torqueless loops, visit the “How to tie and install torqueless loops” article.  To see an instructional video on how to tie in nock sets, visit “How to Tie a Nock Set Using Serving Thread.”

D-loop with no serving

D-loop without serving

This is the simplest and easiest variation to tie, but it also gives the least amount of options.  It is simply a d-loop tied onto the string without any other serving or nock set.

Advantages:

  • simple
  • requires minimal skill and work
  • can be moved up and down string with little effort

Disadvantages:

  • can cause nock pinch which can possibly lift or knock the arrow off the rest
  • if it has to be replaced, there is no location marking once it is removed
  • susceptible to torque

D-loop with single, lower nock set

D-loop with lower serving

 

This version takes the basic d-loop and adds a lower nock set, either tied or brass.  With the large d-loop knot on top and the served nock set on the bottom, there is downward pressure put on the arrow nock.  Great for shooters using a launcher style rest or anyone else who would like a little arrow pressure put on rest and popular with target shooters.

Advantages:

  • downward pressure on arrow, arrow rest
  • can replace the d-loop while leaving nock set to locate arrow nock, only have to set top knot location

Disadvantages:

  • takes more work to locate nock height
  • susceptible to torquing the bowstring

D-loop with upper and lower nock sets

D-loop with lower and upper nock set

This would be my favorite of the variations using the standard d-loop type.  It has the least amount of interference with the nock with drawing and shooting and is very easy to replace in the correctly location since the nock sets don’t have to be removed.

Advantages:

  • least amount of nock interference
  • easy to remove and replace at proper location

Disadvantages

  • slightly more weight due to longer loop
  • most work of any to tie and locate
  • susceptible to torquing the bowstring

Torqueless loop with upper nock set only

Torqueless loop with upper nock set only

The torqueless loop is a more recent style of loop used that hasn’t gained a lot of attention yet.  The idea is to have a loop that can be twisted in any direction without applying torque to the bowstring.  More about these loops, how to tie and install them can be found in the torqueless loop article.

This version is the simplest of installation methods, with a simple, upper nock set and the torqueless loop below.

Advantages:

  • lightest weight of any loop version
  • easily replaced, even in the field with no tools
  • maintains location of nock set
  • torque free
  • extremely long life if tied correctly

Disadvantages:

  • cannot be used to align peep unless tied in
  • can sometimes migrate up and down the string and must be reset
  • lowers the anchor point
  • cannot be use with some pin nocks (they will pop off)

Torqueless loop with upper and lower nock set

Torqueless loop with upper and lower nock set

This is my current favorite method of tying a bowstring loop.  With an upper and lower nock set, the arrow nock position is positively located.  A couple of tied knots below the loop keeps it from migrating down.

Advantages:

  • torque free
  • easily replaced, even in the field with no tools
  • positive arrow nock location
  • does not migrate
  • extremely long life if tied correctly

Disadvantages:

  • cannot be used to align peep unless tied in
  • most work of any to initially setup
  • lowers the anchor point
  • cannot be use with some pin nocks (they will pop off)

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