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The last couple of years Hoyt has made serious waves in the archery world with the introduction of their carbon tube risers used in the Carbon Matrix and Carbon Element bows.  This year the carbons return with an updated cam (and speed!), the RKT cam, along with the all new Vector series of bows.

2012′s RKT cam looks to add about 7FPS to both the Carbon Element and Matrix, and perhaps 1 FPS to the Alpha Elite.  Also notable is the addition of the Long Draw versions for both the Carbon Matrix RKT and the Vector 35.  This helps stretch draw lengths out to 32″ for those shooters with longer arms.

Also updated is the AlphaElite that gets the new RKT cam.

My initial gut feel is that the Vector Turbo looks extremely attractive to me this year.  Hopefully my local shop has their initial order arrive soon and I can put a few arrows through these.

Availability and Pricing (MSRP) for 2012 Hoyt Bows

Many dealers opted to pre-purchase packages of the 2012 Hoyt bows that appear to contain one each of the Carbon Element, Carbon Matrix, Vector 32, Vector 35 and Vector Turbo bows, or some similar variety.  Some shops are reporting that these bows are starting to arrive.  Pricing is not yet fully confirmed on the 2012 bows, but the best reported information on MSRP is listed here.

2012 Hoyt Carbon Element RKT

2012 Hoyt Carbon Element RKT

Speed: 330 FPS
Axle Length 32″
Brace Height 6 3/4”
Draw Length 24 1/2″-30”
Peak Draw Weights: 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 lbs.
Weight 3.6 lbs.
Let-Off  75%
MSRP $1399

 

 

 

2012 Hoyt Carbon Matrix RKT

2012 Hoyt Carbon Matrix RKT

Speed: 325 FPS
Axle Length 35″
Brace Height 6 3/4”
Draw Length 25 1/2”-31”
Peak Draw Weights: 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 lbs.
Weight 3.8 lbs.
Let-Off  75%
MSRP $1399

2012 Hoyt Carbon Matrix Long Draw

Speed: 337 FPS @ 32″
Axle Length 35 1/2″
Brace Height 7 1/2″”
Draw Length 31”-32”
Peak Draw Weights: 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 lbs.
Weight 4 lbs.
Let-Off  75%
MSRP $1399

2012 Hoyt Vector 322012 Hoyt Vector 32

Speed: 330 FPS
Axle Length 32″
Brace Height 6 3/4”
Draw Length 25 1/2”-31”
Peak Draw Weights: 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 lbs.
Weight 4.0 lbs.
Let-Off  75%
MSRP $949

 

 

 

 

2012 Hoyt Vector 35

2012 Hoyt Vector 35

Speed: 325 FPS
Axle Length 35″
Brace Height 6 3/4”
Draw Length 25 1/2”-31”
Peak Draw Weights: 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 lbs.
Weight 4.2 lbs.
Let-Off  75%
MSRP $999

2012 Hoyt Vector Long Draw

Speed: 337 FPS @ 32″
Axle Length 35 1/2″
Brace Height 7 1/2”
Draw Length 31”-32”
Peak Draw Weights: 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 lbs.
Weight 4.0 lbs.
Let-Off  75%
MSRP $999

2012 Hoyt Vector Turbo

2012 Hoyt Vector Turbo

Speed: 340 FPS
Axle Length 35″
Brace Height 6”
Draw Length 24 1/2”-30”
Peak Draw Weights: 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 lbs.
Weight 4.0 lbs.
Let-Off  75%
MSRP $999

 

 

Quick review of shooting the new 2012 Hoyt bows

I had the pleasure of putting a few arrows through the new Hoyt bows and can offer a small summary of my findings until I get the chance to do a full review of them.

The first thing I wanted to do was to compare last year’s Fuel cam to the new RKT cam.  I shot a 2011 Carbon Element and a 2012 RKT version, both at the same draw length and poundage, to try to get a feel for the difference.  Without looking at a draw force curve for reference, I wanted to make my own opinion without tainting it with any outside influences.

When pulling the new RKT cam back, it seems to stack up a little faster than the Fuel but at the end of the draw dumps a little more gently into the valley.  Both cams stack quickly to max poundage and maintain the max weight through the majority of the pull, but there was a definite difference to the feel.  I attempted to “creep” out of each valley to see how quickly the cams want to let go, and the RKT has a bit more of a valley.  I personally don’t care for a large valley and the Spiral is my-all time favorite cam, one notorious for having no valley.  However, those that don’t like the feeling that the bow has no give in the valley will most likely prefer the RKT over the Fuel.  Other than that, the RKT cams are definitely a stiff, high performance cam but they are at the same time very smooth with no noticeable bumps, humps or other unpleasant surprises on the draw.  More on the performance difference on the two in the future.

So now onto the individual bows:  I was most interested in the Vector Turbo as the new Hoyt speed king.  Shooting the Vector was a pleasure and it felt very good in the hand.  The 3/4″ less brace height can definitely be felt on the draw and gives it that “speed bow” feel.  My favorite part of the Vector Turbo is the 35″ ATA.   It felt and held awesome at full draw and I was able to hold the string on my nose without dipping or cheating my head down.  I shot the Turbo with nothing other than a rest on the bow and it had a definite vibration after the shot that could be felt for several seconds.  Adding a sight and stabilizer should take this right out.  Otherwise, the bow had very little movement and stayed close to dead in the hand.  Overall I was very pleased with how this bow shot and it would be on my short list to buy this year.

The Vector 32 and Carbon Element are nearly identical in shape\specs\form, the big different of course being the riser material.  There is a noticeable difference felt by the hand in the 0.4 lbs of weight between the two.  Drawing and anchoring each bow feels nearly identical and each held quiet well for a 32″ ATA bow.  The biggest difference is in the shot, the Element has a definite advantage in the “dead-in-the-hand” category with almost a spooky lack of any vibration or other feedback.  Of course the biggest difference is in the price, a $450 difference in MSRP.  For those that want the latest and greatest, stiffest and most vibration free, the step up to the Carbon riser may be justifiable.  Both are great bows and should make many a happy buyer this year.

Thanks to Rocky Mountain Archery in Ft. Collins for letting me come play with the bows.

Other observations

There are a few other changes to the 2012 Hoyts that are notable.  First, the roller guard got a minor change in the clearance between the rollers and the frame.  The extra space there will make anyone who changes cables rejoice as it will be easier to thread the loops through.

The limbs got upgrade graphics with a new carbon weave pattern and RKT logo.  There are also red highlights in several places on the bow, whether it be the black or camo version.  Graphics, cam modules, rollers, limb bushings and draw stops are all red.  I’m  little torn on this; on one hand it looks great on the black and decent with the camo.  On the other, it’s more restrictive on what a customer can do with the color scheme on their bow.

My favorite change is to the limb pocket.  Hoyt moved from having a pocket that has the limb bolt tap straight into the riser to one with a slot in riser that goes into a tapped bushing (the round red thing you can see in the picture above.)  Also, the limb bolt now takes a full 1/4″ hex drive!  This is a very nice change as it makes turning the limb bolt much easier and lowers the risk of popping the wrench out of the socket and damaging or stripping the bolt.

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